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such a strong economy, how can science correct this issue? because without cracking this issue i think having an illiterate society, a scientific illiterate society that affects the market demand for the science to come about. my friends who are not that scientifically aware, they just want a faster phone and want more pictures on facebook and they want a faster internet connection. what they don't want is a unified theory of physics. they don't want more nasa funding or anything about life. how this -- can science alone fix this problem or is it a bigger problem to society itself? >> huge issue. >> science can't fix big problems like that. they can help but i think the best thing scientists can do is make it more interesting in grades before imagination and creativity have crashed. largely -- 90% of the people educated -- that's what i never took a course in english at the university because i feared the deadening effect of the conventional view of literature. i'm glad i did it. i took the examination. >> it worked out pretty well for you. >> exactly. i'm how to write and i have my own idea
thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament's in session. you can see this week's question time again sunday night at 9 eastern and pacific on c-span. and or for more information go to c-span.org and click on c-span se
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
a forum on jobs, innovation and the economy. a series of panels will examine strategies and best practices to spur economic growth. and what role the private sector plays in all this. that will be live in just a few moments here on c-span2. on monday the president received recommendations from vice president biden's task force on gun control. president obama is expected to unveil his proposal as early as tomorrow. during the final news conference of his first term yesterday, the president responded to a question about the issue. >> i wanted to ask about gun violence. today marks the one year, our one month anniversary of the shooting at newtown which seems to generate some momentum for rinsing the assault weapons ban, but there's been fresh opposition to the banned from the nra and even harry reid has said that he questioned whether to pass congress. given that, how hard will you push for an assault weapons ban? and if one cannot pass congress, what other measures would need to be included in a broad package in order to curb violence? >> as i said, the vice president and a number of member
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4